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Friday, October 15, 2010

Final Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/15/2010 7:01 PM (GMT 00) position was 37°02.36'N 124°52.88'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/15/2010 2:11 PM (GMT 00) position was 37°01.67'N 124°54.81'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Thursday, October 14, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/14/2010 5:29 PM (GMT 00) position was 36°30.09'N 126°57.47'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/13/2010 8:19 PM (GMT 00) position was 36°06.44'N 128°39.92'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/12/2010 7:48 PM (GMT 00) position was 36°16.37'N 130°09.82'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/12/2010 12:49 AM (GMT 00) position was 36°24.66'N 131°55.33'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Monday, October 11, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/11/2010 12:25 AM (GMT 00) position was 36°52.54'N 133°57.54'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sunday, October 10, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/10/2010 2:49 AM (GMT 00) position was 36°53.46'N 135°57.90'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Saturday, October 9, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/8/2010 8:52 PM (GMT 00) position was 35°54.58'N 139°10.63'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Friday, October 8, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/8/2010 1:01 AM (GMT 00) position was 34°41.20'N 140°33.63'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/6/2010 7:51 PM (GMT 00) position was 34°08.34'N 143°41.86'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/5/2010 10:49 PM (GMT 00) position was 33°59.57'N 145°42.59'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Monday, October 4, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/4/2010 10:40 PM (GMT 00) position was 33°11.95'N 147°48.27'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sunday, October 3, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/3/2010 8:58 PM (GMT 00) position was 33°10.21'N 148°02.97'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Saturday, October 2, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/2/2010 9:31 PM (GMT 00) position was 33°00.41'N 148°22.48'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/2/2010 2:24 AM (GMT 00) position was 32°16.57'N 147°51.60'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sailmail Position Report

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At 10/2/2010 2:24 AM (GMT 00) position was 32°16.57'N 147°51.60'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Thursday, September 30, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/30/2010 9:31 PM (GMT 00) position was 31°08.24'N 148°17.72'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/29/2010 8:46 PM (GMT 00) position was 30°36.81'N 148°38.71'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/28/2010 11:27 PM (GMT 00) position was 29°53.34'N 148°42.43'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/28/2010 2:04 AM (GMT 00) position was 30°02.00'N 149°14.75'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Monday, September 27, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/26/2010 8:31 PM (GMT 00) position was 28°50.67'N 151°11.32'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Sunday, September 26, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/25/2010 11:18 PM (GMT 00) position was 27°47.32'N 152°44.23'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Saturday, September 25, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/24/2010 6:26 PM (GMT 00) position was 26°12.44'N 154°39.98'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Friday, September 24, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/23/2010 6:20 PM (GMT 00) position was 24°53.64'N 156°20.22'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Thursday, September 23, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 9/23/2010 2:57 AM (GMT 00) position was 24°04.38'N 156°41.51'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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Saturday, September 18, 2010

Hurth ZF 25M

A while back when putting the engine back into the engine room I misread the oil dipstick markings and overfilled Hurth transmission with ATF oil – it instantly overheated while the engine was getting “broken in” at the dock after the rebuild. Noticing the excess temperature the oil level I got out the manual and read it only to find out that indeed overfilling will cause this type of transmission to overheat. Adjusting the level lowered the temperature to operating level and transmission seemed to work fine. Hidden inside, however, shaft seal broke apart causing shaft to wobble and loosen the bolts that held the seal together. About 50 hours later this becomes evident in the light of what seems like a complete engine failure, and of course, far out at sea. Luckily Hurth makes lots of these and TAD will gladly ship one to you at which point it becomes a relatively easy swap out job. I had to get a new damper plate and a keyhole adapter plate, TAD has these in stock as well. Bottom line is read the ZF manual and don’t count on the overheated transmission: something will fail sooner or later - knowing all this back then I would have just gotten a new one right then and there.

Saturday, August 28, 2010

Sailmail Position Report

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At 8/28/2010 6:28 PM (GMT 00) position was 14°04.87'N 160°08.94'W Please add or subtract hours with daylight savings in mind.

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SPOT

SPOT device has been having some delivery issues due to limited sat some places so I will be using Sailmail along with a computer GPS to report Victoria's position on this blog along with daily emails, as usual: about once a day; So far 14 more degrees to the Equator.

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Tuesday, August 24, 2010

SPOT Map

Finally figured out a way to display SPOT map on the Blogger. It takes some time to load, but who cares. If it does not display very well for you, the data can be also found at http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0HBoZh1hhXe6J5E3uANfvL3LngZoEUvfG
If, by chance, map displays message "No Feeds" that means that the track is too old to display. Aloha!

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Hawaii 2010 Photos

Some  photos http://picasaweb.google.com/dmitrysphotos/Hawaii2010# we took while in Oahu, Hawaii. The time is upheld to its highest regard in this State; its mystery is only allured by its beauty (slightly tainted by local election rivalry). Thank you "Valis" and "Ruby Slippers" for very valuable tips on delivering this post via SSB modulation with the help of the dreaded SCS PACTOR protocol. There are no answers because choices are all but their own. Aloha!
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Saturday, July 24, 2010

Pacific Cup 2010 Photos

http://picasaweb.google.com/dmitrysphotos/PacificCup2010#

This is from Dmitry's camera. Tommy Dixon has some cool sailing photos/videos as well, hopefully he'll share it with us.

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Final updates

Victoria Spot page will be updated at http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0HBoZh1hhXe6J5E3uANfvL3LngZoEUvfG

Tommy Dixon is our official third teammate

We will have a Sunday ID4 BBQ on the boat and sail the SF Bay too.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Pacific Cup last minute preparations

Crew Change:

We decided to add a third person to the crew as a matter of safety, sanity and sleep. Pac Cup administration was very helpful in changing divisions. We hope to find someone no later than 20 of June to make sure we have plenty of time to get along. More on this as story develops…

Board the boat. I like a challenge. 

Water maker:

Very little updates for now due to the limited time – down to the wire on our preparations. The major item lef on Victoria is the water maker. It was left for the last because it is more of a pleasure item, not a necessity. Some people may argue otherwise. The system on board is Pureflex 200 made by UAT/Severn Trent. Company makes very large reverse osmosis systems, this is the smallest one of the line, capable of 200 gal/day or about 8gal/hr. I really liked the system because it uses readily available industrial grade components such as motors and pumps. The system is tied together with head unit that is by itself quite complex. I decided to get new high pressure and booster pump and membranes - I was not confident to how the system was maintained. I did not like extensive use of plastic/polyurethane tubing and fittings - switching everything to brass will increase reliability.

High Pressure Pump Cat 237

Autopilot and wind vane:

Simrad J300X Main board went hasta la vista. The power board and main board can be replaced, but only if one knows for a fact which board is dead; I did not have a good board to test with at the time so I bought a new unit instead. I kept the old unit – supposedly there is a company in So Cal that will get it to work for a flat fee – I’ll keep it as a spare. Wind vane lived up to its name, except I still need to learn adjusting it – over time it likes to turn into the wind slowly, or the wind changes a little - I am not sure. Autopilot picks up where wind vane left off at low and down winds.

Goodbye Hal

Provisions:

Still experimenting…

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Rudolph Jr

Few weeks of looking at the energy management plan on board, it comes as no surprise that power storage is the bottleneck of the system. A bank of four batteries is almost a minimum number of batteries that needs to be carried on board of Victoria. In order to safely start auxiliary the bank is broken into two separate banks in order to have a fresh set of batteries available after running electronics and lighting all night. With all navigation, communication and lighting running at the same time the two-battery bank holds up until sunrise; batteries need either constant recharge maintenance or expanded battery storage; neither seems to fly too well. 135 Watt solar panel charges the batteries, but in reality it only averages about 5 amps; thus 60 Watts, not 135 and only during the daytime. On Victoria an answer comes from another source. Victoria has a 5kw Northern Lights marine diesel generator set with a M643M 1800 RPM engine. Lower RPM makes it quiet and supposedly more lasting (Lt. Howard: Whiskey! thins down the mix for another 50 RPM). TF-276M generator puts out 50 Amps at 110 Volts in 60 Hertz intervals. Genset charges batteries easily while allowing to run “luxury” 110V items onboard: teapot, microwave, water maker, water heater etc. The genset comes into light as an integral of the entire energy system. The M643M was my nemesis for a while mainly due to the fact that it is seemingly hard to get to - most sailboats have very limited space for something like this. Greg Ward must be given a fair credit for getting it going originally. Exhaust elbow was in non-working order due to heat and saltwater (very common fault judging by the fact that the replacement part comes in stainless steel) - until now this genset is nothing but a big saltwater fountain – a “small-guy” job to get behind it to fix it. The fuel delivery system is already upgraded from earlier with an addition of a new filter and fuel shut-off valve, an important safety item. The genset itself is built with close quarters marine environment in mind. The key to working on the unit is its ability to rotate on one mount with three-mount attachment system, a major benefit the newer M673 version lacks due to an added fourth engine mount. Luckily the service side has a clever design allowing for nice all-in-one maintenance access. 


Brief notes while working with unit are as follows:

Performing overhaul of most cooling and pumping components of the system is quite easy and is part of the task to make sure the unit runs well. Standard panel has automatic high temp/low psi shut-off but no gauges. Installing analog temperature and pressure gauges directly onto the engine avoids wiring mess and is cool-looking - I love solutions such as this. Oil, coolant, filters and belt parts, gasket sealer, touch-up paint are available in local auto store. Impeller, zinks salt-off, ss harware are available in local marine store. Northern Lights “drop-ships” specialized parts very quickly. The unit is very well designed and is built to last. Northern Lights has excellent manuals to download and tech support is also very helpful and quick. Time estimate was about 20 hours plus waiting/ordering for parts; it took 30, as usual. Material cost for the minor overhaul is about 10% of original engine cost. In retrospect, after a major rebuilt on Victoria’s auxiliary and minor overhaul on genset I slowly learned the following to be true on re-powering: when considering rebuilding engine vs buying a new engine, the cost doubles to do the later; fair installation will right about match your initial engine cost or cost of a rebuilt; for new engine: consider access points and dimensions before buying, go for the best engine, best warranty and professional marina installer; on a rebuilt engine: save old parts before the new one is installed and tested to work; double check everything and add a factor of 1.25 to 1.5 on time; in a rebuilt or new engine weakest link is usually not the diesel engine itself; break-in new or rebuilt diesel engine at the dock with transmission engaged – during the first 100 hours at least one thing will go south; Getting parts for older engines is much easier, but just as expensive as for new. Double-check all advice with professionals. This is always a learning process: this is what I live for, DBF!


Nikki Rose upgrades


Nikki Rose has been put under a variety of tests ever since its been launched: speed, range under oars and motor, versatility and equipment capacity, ease of use and durability. Overall it has archived a well-balanced score on all levels. Some notes so far consist of the following: while rowing at about 75% of maximum load the rowlocks failed in shear – rowlocks are made out of high tensile plastic material, but that was not enough. I informed the BIC of the problem and got a set of the same rowlocks in the mail – they flat out refused to change the rowlock from plastic to higher-grade material. If you never had one fail on you, try rowing with one paddle – impossible. West Marine carries a stainless steel rowlocks; in my opinion, a must upgrade on any BIC 245 boat. While corporate concern for safety is “iffy”, versatility of BIC 245 model is unquestionable. I have found a very easy way to lift the dinghy onto the boat single-handed; it fits perfectly on the bow of Victoria and literally locks in at 90 degrees for sail locker access. In retrospect the 245 is still the best unsinkable dinghy around, especially for short-handling situations. Originally it was selected against others based on the following:


Length
Weight
Capacity
Cost
Weight to Capacity
Sinkable
KL Watertender
9.5
114
439
Low
26%
Yes
Pelican Scorpio
10.2
115
520
Mid
22%
Yes
BIC 245
8
86
551
Mid-High
16%
No
Portland Pudgy
7.8
128
557
High
23%
No

Weight to Capacity ratio was astonishing. BIC 245 almost matches infamous Portland Pudgy in capacity at third of its weight. Chart does not consider inflatable dinghies.

Minn Kota Riptide 45 with a full SeaGel 97Ah battery gives range of about one nautical mile (she motors for 40 minutes at 2-3 knots and 20 minutes at 2 knots) When rowing I can archive up-to 4 knots speed for relatively short periods of time. I didn’t invest in gasoline-powered engine for number of personal and technical reasons. Nikki Rose is 100% solar powered dinghy. 130 Watt Kyocera KC130TM is regulated by SunSaver Duo 25 Amp Controller that splits solar energy into two banks: main and emergency. SeaGel 97Ah battery acts both as “always ready” emergency bank and dinghy bank on the vessel. While ashore Go Power GPDL-10 10-Watt Self Regulating Unbreakable Solar Module charges the dinghy bank via car-charger type socket.

Nikki Rose can be used with the following elements depending on the landing situation:

Personal Life-jackets (always)
Standard Horizon HX850 Personal VHF with 12V charging cradle
Go Power! 10-Watt Self Regulating Unbreakable Solar Module
Minn Kota Riptide 45 with Minn Kota Trolling Motor Power Center
Guest 10 Amp Portable 110V Charger
(2) “Perfect” Bungee Cords
Overboard Waterproof Tube-like Back Pack
REI Camping and Fishing Gear
Aqua Signal White Stern Mounted LED Light
Fortress FX-7 Anchor and line
Scotty Throw Bag w/ 50 MFP Floating Line

Thermos Stainless Steel 1/2-litre capacity

Personal gear


Monday, April 26, 2010

Storm Sail Setup

I finally got around to raising the storm sails on Victoria. OSR requires three sets of sails: Storm Jib, Heavy Weather Jib and Storm Trysail; Pac Cup gives a choice between Storm Jib or Heavy Weather Jib and leaves Storm Trysail as a requirement. For the Storm Jib I picked ATN Gale sail because Victoria does not have a second forestay so the only viable option was to get the sail that can be set over the Genoa. I fell in love the ATN Gale sail; in all respects worth having. Victoria has a very large Genoa that is great in light winds; in strong winds it becomes a liability is difficult to handle and is very inefficient when partly furled in.



ATN Gale sail sets very nicely over the Genoa and protects it from unfurling. Someone had mentioned that it could chafe the Genoa but ATN denies it completely and so far I agree. Trysail is nice to have but it is a little more difficult to put up compared to the Mizzen sail. I think Mizzen/ATN sail combination is a perfect setup for storm weather, but Trysail is not too bad either. Independent track for Trysail is an OSR requirement and I think that Schafer external sail track is a good pick for it because it allows to set Trysail at almost any angle to the wind - having to face the boat into the wind to change a sail is very difficult task to perform while shorthanded in bad weather. Victroia’s main mast allows for a setup that keeps away halyard and Main Sail away from the Trysail (eliminating chafe points), but this may be a problem for boats with limited winches cleats positioned at the mast.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Becoming of a Lean Cruising Machine

This blog is overdue for an update – cats have been busy getting past the inspection and finishing up loose ends on the Victoria. Captain has now a very nice log book, compliments of the First Mate - having to fill it out has been a real pleasure. Prior to inspection we have been working on emergency steering setup and external track for the trysail on the main mast. Both projects have been very educating. Climbing the mast to install the track has been craziest task I’ve done so far. Some sailors love it, but I will get used to it at best. To get up the mast I use Mast Mate system with their work tool belt, climbing harness, climbing rope and Petzl Ascension device from REI.



This setup allows me to climb both of my masts alone (although I send a text to First Mate every time I go up and come down) I use climbing rope because of its superior breaking strength and chafe, but mostly because Petzl Ascension device is not meant to be used with yacht braid. After replacing the halyard with climbing rope by tying in two bowline knots one after another to the top of the Mast Mate, I raise Mast Mate and secure climbing rope at the base and at the beam chain plates and back to Mast Mate for security. After attaching the Petzl Ascension to my climbing harness I go up the mast. I found this setup very safe and comfortable. Some of the advantages are: ability to go up alone and ability to shift my weight from the mast mate to climbing harness in order to rest, change tools or body position around mast.



Later I took a look at my wind vane setup. My berthing neighbor Clark and his Vessel Condessa have sailed around the Earth and into some very wicked and interesting situations. His boat has the same wind vane as mine so I looked at his setup as a perfect token of what mine should look like. After some very good advice from Clark I changed some of the weakness-prone hardware and prepared a setup for holding the wind vane (also emergency rudder) in place at 90-degree angle to the boat. This altogether was an interesting experience for me because I enjoy working with stainless steel and rigging in general. Condessa has a SS chain and quick-disconnect shackles holding its auxilary rudder in place - a very sturdy and easy setup. I wanted something similar but with an added ability to tighten or loosen the rudder quickly while underway to prevent it from swaying back and forth. My requirements for the system were ease of use, structural integrity and ability to take apart and put back together – all qualities of the original wind vane design.



Three integral parts of the setup became stainless eye bolts, wire, shackles, turn buckles, wire rope clips and thimbles. With these elements one has a fair chance to solve at least a minor standing rigging issue while underway.
I keep 100’ of ¼” ss wire rope and a number of equal diameter connecting elements in my rigging box for this reason alone.


I am very much fond of reusable rigging components. My current standing rigging is built using Sta-Lok fittings which eliminates a need for a professional rigging shop if there is none nearby or if there is one, the cost of new rigging comes down dramatically.




SF Bay has been teaching me lessons ever since I sailed for the first time. That first lesson was simply that sailing is what separates us from the animals. The most recent one was to tie in all permanent “screw-in” shackle pins with wire as to avoid unintentional disconnect of the pin. This is especially true with new blocks and shackles you’ve just put in – that shiny new pin will fly away just like that.



After going through our OSR inspection I felt quite confident in the boat. One of the better advices from my inspector was to “think vertically” to see what would happen if the boat were to capsize. I started to look more into the issue of what will actually fall upside-down. Heavy items and exterior openings were at the top of my list. Luckily designers at Les Chantiers Amel have put a lot of thought into “tightening the hatches” For example they have created various pins and rope features that secure all exterior lockers and compartments in case of capsize. Entry hatch cant “fall out” because of the permanent dodger above it. The engine is secured with a permanent bracket in the front that will prevent it from falling and damaging the shaft. As I looked at these features of the boat in this new inverted light I could not help but gain confidence in my vessel. The two things I found still in “falling capsize position” were engine room batteries and water in the keel placed water tank. I decided to secure battery trays cover with hinges and attach a starboard cover over the water tank. “Cats” still have to do annual MOB practice and CPR training (I think Pac Cup has it waived but we will do it anyway); that is pretty much it as far as OSR requirements go. Practice time baby.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Ultimate Engine Problem Solver

So here is the ultimate engine problem solver. I boxed it together from readily available yet really cool marine grade stuff. There are two filters in parallel to allow for fuel to go from one or another depending on which way the lever turned. One of the filters came with a 30 micron filter which I had to change it to 2 micron; the second filter is also a 2 micron. 30 and 10 micron filters allow more bad fuel to get to the engine and I didn’t want that for my auxiliary. The essence of the setup is such that one can easily switch from primary filter to the secondary all while keeping the engine running smooth at first sign of trouble. I first wanted to fit the y-valve at the diesel IN but later decided that it would be better from the perspective of the secondary filter to fit the valve on OUT; this assures that secondary filter is always primed; on the downside it may have to be bled a little from accumulated air as a precaution before switching. I know there are systems like that for sale, but I have never seen them or the filter elements for them; the spin-on series filter elements I used are sold in the smallest of marine stores. The spin-on filter can be outfitted with some crazy accessories like a fuel heater (yes, heated fuel gets to injectors long after the engine is running). I stopped at having all that except for a filter service indicator on the primary filter. I paid a lot of attention to making sure the system is air-tight and accessible. Before installing it I drained few gallons of diesel in case some bad fuel still wanted to come out. I tested the engine under load with various RPMs for about 3 hours overall, occasionally switching the filters with the engine running evenly smooth. Having ample time to deal with a bad fuel filter is truly priceless to me after ours had gone out at the worst possible time. I refurbished the old filter with a 10 micron element and fitted it onto the gen-set fuel system as a form of recycling. Fair winds!

Monday, March 22, 2010

The Shakedown Shake Up!


After one and a half years of tireless and careful work from team adventure cats, Victoria finally left her slip in Napa Valley Marina for her first test run on March 19, 2010.  Perhaps the old sailors’ superstition of never leaving on a Friday holds some water because the first run resulted in a brief emergency scramble.  The results were some damage to the first mate and team spirit but thankfully nothing else.  The rest of this cursed Friday was spent on several engine and wind vane adjustments as well as giving many thanks that things were not the worse for wear. 
            The brisk, springtime Napa air welcomed Adventure Cats’ second attempt at a victorious cruise to Tiburon to meet family for a celebratory lunch the following morning.  Little did we know that shakedown part two would result in some sound lessons for the team on the importance of details, particularly when concerning diesel engines.  With a mixture of excitement and confidence that the engine problems were fixed, we departed and cruised smoothly down the Napa River until Victoria reached the Mare Island Bridge.  Our rebuilt diesel engine got us past the pylons (with a little prayer) but failed shortly after. Slightly better prepared than before, Adventure Cats handled the situation admirably and with the help of the captain’s superior driving skills, docked safely in the Vallejo Marina with only some small cosmetic damage to our exterior paint and some shaken nerves.
            Thoroughly disheartened, Adventure Cats found themselves in an unknown marina with mysterious engine problems and a scratched paint job.  However, we hoisted ourselves up by our bootstraps and with a little encouragement from the first mate and help from team mechanic Greg Ward, Victoria is once again ready to sail the high seas!  Besides, an offshore boat with no tales of adventure or battle scars is no offshore boat at all.

Sunday Update: Adventure Cats spent about an hour at West Marine with Kent earlier today pulling together a diesel filter contraption that would allow switching from one filter to another through a Y-valve. Captain strongly believes this set-up will help avoid this sort of experience in the future.  Although old fuel got drained before departure, the primary filter got clogged quick as the boat sat at the dock for what seemed to be an eternity. An email was also sent to the maker of the Awl-grip paints to find out the best way to fix our battle scar. Lets not do that again.

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Official Theme of the Adventure Cats Team is Selected

By Captains Orders official theme of the Adventure Cats Team is a Down Periscope (1996) movie http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_Mx1kA3irk

Harr.

Friday, January 29, 2010

ISAF/ORC CATEGORY 1 CHECKLIST SO FAR

ITEMS REMAINING TO DATE:


_____Two halyards per mast: ADD SECOND HALYARD TO MIZZEN MAST

_____Lifelines (6.61-62): REPLACE WITH NON-COATED SS 1-19 WIRE

_____Padeyes for harness tethers: INSTALL 2 PADEYES AT COCKPIT

_____Storm trysail on its own track: ADD TRACK FOR STORM TRYSAIL

_____Annual person-overboard practice: MOB PRACTICE TBD

_____Galley: ATTACH PROPANE TANK TO THE HULL

_____Water tanks, two independent tanks with pumps: ATTACH SMALLER WATER TANK

_____Two fire extinguishers: ADD SECOND FE

_____Navigation lights (9.8): COMPLETE WIRING ON FORE AND AFT LIGHTS

_____Water on Board: ADD WATER PER REQ BEFORE DEPARTURE

_____Fuel on Board: ADD FUEL PER REQ BEFORE DEPARTURE

_____First aid kit and manual: ADD FIRST AID KIT

_____Name on misc. buoyant equipment: WHATEVER

_____Energy Plan: INSTALL/WIRE SOLAR PANEL/UNPLUG SHORE POWER FOR A MONTH

_____Safety at Sea class: ALL TO TAKE CLASS



ITEMS GOOD TO GO:


PHRF Rating

Two hatches, watertight, hatches fwd of max. beam open outward

Companionway blockable to shear line without restricting access

Hatch board securing arrangement operable from both sides

Hatch boards secured by lanyards

Cockpit volume within limits (6.23)

Cockpit self-draining: 4 - 3/4" D. drains or equiv. (6.25)

1" toe rail around foredeck

Jack-lines (must be clipable from companonway)

Topping lift or supporting vang

Steering compass

Storm trysail with a sail number

Storm jib (65% hoist, 30% area, as per 10.21.2)

Means of attaching jib to stay, other than headfoil

Sail number on main

Emergency tiller

Emergency rudder or other means of steering

Overboard pole, buoy, drogue, light, whistle (11.52)

Lifesling with attached light

Heaving line (50 ft. 1/4" floating line)

Current ISAF/ORC liferaft (THANK YOU FEATUREPICS.COM :)

Band-it tool

Rigging cutter

Starting battery

Shutoff valves on all fuel tanks

Valves on all through-hulls (with exceptions, 6.51)

Wood plugs (preferably attached to through-hulls)

Manual bilge pump, operable from inside

Inside pump operation test

Manual bilge pump, operable from outside

Outside pump operation test

Lanyards on bilge pump handles

Two anchors

Emergency navigation lights, separate power source (10.1)

12 SOLAS red parachute flares

4 SOLAS red hand flares

4 white hand flares

2 SOLAS orange smoke flares

VHF with channels 6, 16, 68, 71, 72

VHF emergency antenna

Waterproof hand-held VHF (or portable with purpose-built bag)

SSB radio

Req'd freqs: 2182, 4146(4A), 8294(8A), 8297(8B), ITU 816(8240/8764)

Emergency SSB antenna

EPIRB

Weather radio

Depth sounder (or lead line)

Speedometer or distance measuring equipment

Two buckets

Flashlights, including waterproof and signaling flashlights

Foghorn

Radar reflector (12" diameter)

Spare compass

Charts, Light list, plotting equipment

Sextant, tables, timepiece: ADD NAUTICAL ALMANC FOR 2010

Lifejackets, one per crew, type I or inspected inflatable

Whistle attached to lifejackets

Reflective material on lifejackets

Harness, one per crew, shackle at harness end (11.2)

Sunday, January 10, 2010

We are racing!

Adventure Cats learned to use the band-it tool today and “Victoria” got a sail number 38051 from Sailrite (assigned by Yacht Racing Association of San Francisco Bay)… Yeah, no more “Get out of the way, we are racing!” from a guy on a port tack. That day we proudly stood our ground, and he had lost the race long before it began - one down, the rest fortis fortuna adiuvat! We are part of the click now.


Monday, January 4, 2010

Nikki Rose Completes Her Maiden Voyage!

Napa, California – January 3, 2009 – Nikki Rose, Victoria’s new tender, took to the sea for the first time today, thus extending Victoria’s travel ability. Nikki Rose departed before a gathering of about five people including guests, boatyard personnel, and fellow sailors. The launch of Nikki Rose marks the beginning of Adventure Cats travel ability to anywhere on the globe regardless of the landing conditions ashore.



The maiden voyage was marked by ceremonial practice of christening with a bottle of Snapple Peach Tea and lasted approximately three hours ending at 16:00 PST. Skipper Dmitry Shkipin and First Mate Nikki Wutke tested Nikki Rose’s ability to contrive in the water, its versatility on deck and overall seaworthiness.

Nikki Rose was routed around local marina with maximum attained speed of about 2 knots with local tide current at about 3 knots at the time of testing. Both Skipper and the First Mate agreed that Nikki Rose performed as expected.

"Today is a fun day for the Adventure Cats team members who have been working hard on Victoria for over a year – its about time we have some actual fun time on the water" said skipper. "We look forward to the upcoming voyage to the Monterey Bay, where Victoria can show her true offshore colors for the first time since launch." Skipper noted dinghy's only drawback - a luck of a cup holder.

Powered by either manual labor or Minn Kota Riptide 45 Lb saltwater trolling motor, the BIC 245 dingy offers Adventure Cats an exceptionally light, solidly built and stable dinghy experience. The new BIC 245 is the result of 35 years of experience and development by BIC company, that until recently was known as a pen producing enterprise. Due to BIC 245 lightweight built team will have a TON of fun carrying fellow Adventure Cats members and equipment to an anchored boat and back to shore again.

Contacts:

Bic Sport Headquarters
ZI du Prat -BP 03716
56 000 Vannes Cedex
France
Tel. : +33 (0)2 97 43 75 00
Fax: +33 (0)2 97 43 75 01

Johnson Outdoors Inc. (Headquarters)
555 Main St.
Racine, WI 53403
USA
Tel: 262-631-6600
Fax: 262-631-6601

Snapple Beverage Corporation
P.O. Box 9400
East Meadow, New York 11554
USA
Tel. (516) 222-0022

Friday, January 1, 2010

2010 Project Solaris Begins!



"ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS EXCEPT EUROPA. ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE"